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STIBNITE

Overview:

Stibnite is a classic mineral species with fine crystal clusters and long curved crystals being the pride of many collectors. The slender curved metallic blades of stibnite can resemble arabian swords. The curving of the long bladed crystals is due to twinning where one twin plane bends the crystal one direction and another twin plane bends it in the other direction.

Stibnite has a structure similar to that of arsenic trisulfide, As2S3. The Sb(III) centers, which are pyramidal and three-coordinate, are linked via bent two-coordinate sulfide ions. It is grey when fresh, but can turn superficially black due to oxidation in air.

Stibnite has a structure similar to that of arsenic trisulfide, As2S3. The Sb(III) centers, which are pyramidal and three-coordinate, are linked via bent two-coordinate sulfide ions. It is grey when fresh, but can turn superficially black due to oxidation in air.Stibnite's crystal clusters are admired for their distinctive look with dozens of accicular or bladed crystals jutting out in many divergent directions.

Physical Properties:

Stibnite (Antimonite)

Stibnite Birthstone

Crystal System
orthorhombic
Chemistry
Sb2S3, Antimony Sulfide
Specific Gravity
4.6 to 4.7
Hardness
2
Source
Worldwide
Chakra
Earth

Pastes of Stibnite powder in fa or in other materials have been used since 3000 BC as eye cosmetics in the Middle East and farther afield; in this use, Stibnite is called kohl. It was used to darken the brows and lashes, or to draw a line around the perimeter of the eye.

Antimony trisulfide finds use in pyrotechnic compositions, namely in the glitter and fountain mixtures. Needle-like crystals, "Chinese Needle", are used in glitter compositions and white pyrotechnic stars. Stibnite is also a component of modern safety matches. It was formerly used in flash compositions, but its use was abandoned due to toxicity and sensitivity to static electricity.

Usage:Austral travel, rigidity, oesophagus, stomach. Stibnite is still used in some developing countries as a medication.

Legend:The natural sulfide of antimony, stibnite, was known and used in Biblical times, as a medication and in Islamic/pre-Islamic times as a cosmetic. Stibnite gets its name from the Greek name "stibi", used to describe antimony which was used to separate gold by the ancients

Occurrence: Notable occurrences include Hunan province, China; Japan; Germany; Brazil; Peru and South Africa. Small deposits of stibnite are common, but large deposits are rare. It occurs in Canada, Mexico, Peru, Japan, China, Germany, Romania, Italy, France, England, Algeria, and Kalimantan, Borneo.