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MOLYBDENITE

Overview:Molybdenite is a very soft metallic mineral. It can be easily confused with graphite, but not with many other minerals. Graphite is a darker black-silver color and a black-gray to brown-gray streak, whereas molybdenite has a bluish-silver color and streak.

The atomic structure consists of a sheet of molybdenum atoms sandwiched between sheets of sulphur atoms. The Mo-S bonds are strong, but the interaction between the sulfur atoms at the top and bottom of separate sandwich-like tri-layers is weak, resulting in easy slippage as well as cleavage planes.

Molybdenite crystals have the same hexagonal symmetry as those of tungstenite (tungsten disulfide). Both have layered structures and similar physical properties; the chief difference is the higher specific gravity of tungstenite.

Physical Properties:

Molybdenite

Molybdenite Birthstone

Crystal System
Hexagonal
Chemistry
MoS2, Molybdenum sulphide
Hardness
1-1.5
Source
USA, Russia, England, Canada, Sweden, Australia
Chakra
Third eye
Number
7

Sign of Molybdenite:Scorpio

Usage:

Jaw pain, teeth, circulation, oxygenation, immune system. The presence of the radioactive isotope rhenium-187 and its daughter isotope osmium-187 provides a useful geochronologic dating technique.

Legend:

The name Molybdenite comes from the Greek word Molybdos, meaning lead. Known as the dreamerís stone, it integrates the everyday self with the higher self and facilitates spiritual expansion. If you need a healing dream, place Molybdenite under your pillow. Repairing and replenishing the subtle bodies, this stone operates exceptionally well at a mental level. It has a powerful electrical charge that continually recharges and rebalances the body when in its field. Molybdenite eliminates mercury toxicity from the body, and harmonizes mercury fillings to a more beneficial vibration. It is reputed to facilitate intergalactic contact.

Occurrence: Important deposits include the disseminated porphyry molybdenum deposits at Questa, New Mexico and the Henderson and Climax mines in Colorado. Molybdenite also occurs in porphyry copper deposits of Arizona, Utah, and Mexico.